Loving the BITE: Let your Ginger be your Medicine

20
Mar
2014

gingerdipWith an average 80 revolutions per minute on the bike, knee flexion and extension occurs about 4800 times an hour.  That’s a lot of joint use.  Perhaps joint overuse throughout an entire season.  It’s estimated that 50% of cyclists experience knee joint pain as an overuse injury, in addition to other joint overuse pain in the back, hands, and shoulders.

As you head into the on-season, you can plan to protect your joints.  In fact, you can do so with your foods.

This week, we’re heading into the kitchen to whip up a wonderful dip for vegetables, meats, sandwiches, and more.  It’s loaded with foods that protect, heal, and reduce pain in joints.

Recipe of the Week: Delicious Spicy Ginger Dip

Ingredients:

Avocado Mayo:

  • 1 avocado
  • 2 Tbsp. lemon juice
  • 6 Tbsp. olive or avocado oil
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 2 Tbsp water

Ginger Dip:

  • 1 Tbsp. liquid aminos or soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon white vinegar
  • 5 Tbsp. fresh ginger (finely chopped) or 2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 2 tablespoons minced onion
  • 1 dash habanero garlic hot pepper sauce

Instructions:

First, mix all ingredients of avocado mayo until smooth in food processor (or by hand if okay with more coarse mix).  Then, add in the remaining 5 ingredients to make ginger dip.  Use as a dip/sauce on chicken, beef, seafoods, vegetables or kale  chips.

***Ginger tip: If using fresh ginger, easily remove the skin of ginger by scraping it with the edge of a spoon.

Comments:

ginger

To a cyclist, joints are supremely important.  They are what make the pedals go round.  And when they hurt, they put the ride to a halt fast.  Revolution after revolution, you need healthy, happy joints.  And, believe it or not, some foods are pro-healthy-joint.  This week, we’re reviewing the benefits and research on ginger and joints.

First, ginger is loaded with anti-inflammatories, antioxidants, and phytochemicals (trust me, all good things!), and specifically it has benefits for joint pain and joint health.  Additionally, studies in the last few years show that it’s effective in reducing muscle soreness in athletes.  In fact, in one study, participants took either 2 grams ginger or placebo each day for several days before strenuous exercise, and the ginger participants had a 25% reduction in soreness indicators vs. those on placebo.

To use ginger to reduce soreness (along with rest days, l-glutamine, recovery snacks, hydration, and activities like foam rolling), aim to get 2 grams per day.  You can choose 4 ginger pill supplements per day (check out the label, but most are 500 mg each), 2 teaspoons of fresh ginger each day, or 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger.

Reduced muscle soreness is great, but what else do you get from ginger? You’ll get strong anti-inflammatory nutrients with (anti) inflammation score of +129, slightly better than garlic.  Since inflammation plays a role with almost every chronic disease, oxidative stress, obesity, and fatigue, it is very beneficial to include as many anti-inflammatory foods in our diets as possible. Ginger also promotes gut health, may be anti-cancerous, is immune boosting, and anti-inflammatory.

Bonus: Find additional ginger recipes here.

Bonus: More joint health with dark cherry juice here.

You can keep your joints feeling great, and rotating smoothly this season.  You can proactively nourish them.  Let your food be your medicine.

Fuel Your Ride. Nourish Your Body. 

 

Enjoy Your Ride
Pin It

Leave a Reply

Sponsors

Featured on these top sites

Blog Partners

Cycling 360 Podcast

Causes

Sugar Alternatives for Energy and Hydration

Question: I am using the homebrew sugar formulations (sometimes added to green tea).  I am also trying to wean myself off 1/2 dose adrenalean “lip tonic delivery system” (biorhythm brand- caffeine, hoodia g, synephrine, yohimbe) capsule for energy.

My question is other than juice, can you suggest modifications in lieu of table sugar for energy and hydration.

Answer:

Both raw/organic honey or agave can work great in the homebrew (substitute in the same quantities for the sugar, or to taste), but you do have to shake well in order to make sure they don’t settle out.  Have you tried either of these?  Also, make sure to use at least the minimum amount of salt recommended in the homebrew as the temps rise, you need the sodium replacement if you’re sweating.

Sports Drink Homebrew

Please send us your questions for our Expert Sports Nutritionist, Kelli Jennings to “Ask the Sports Nutritionist“. Kelli Jennings is a Registered Dietitian with a passion for healthy eating, wellness, & sports nutrition. For more information go to www.apexnutritionllc.com.

Nutrition Tips